Friday, December 17, 2004

WEDNESDAY RIDDLE EXPLAINED

On Wednesday morning, I was in my stretch limo on the way to the studio, schmoozing with the driver about all the other celebrities he’s driven in his career. There’s the expected range of good, bad and ugly. Cher’s a diva. Gere’s a jerk. Reeve was a saint, even before the accident. We talk about celebrity, and how the power of prominence can either be used for good or for evil. Of course, those are my words, not his. He uses words that I don’t hear every day, like “Fuggedaboutit” and “not for nothin’.”

I arrived at the studio and a PA escorted me to a room with my name on the door; the room is only slightly smaller than my apartment. There’s food there—2 muffins, some fruit, and two bowls of butter and cream cheese that indicated that the room was not invented for me. Someone must have eaten the bagels before I got there. Had I been a true diva, I would have thrown a rock star style fit, but I decided to let it slide (this once).

For those who asked, and those who didn’t, I spent Wednesday afternoon taping an episode of the WB talk show Life & Style. No, it wasn’t my big break, no audition to take over for Jules Asner in the glamour spot, nor had I been invited to share my expertise on the Jewish dating scene. I was there merely for my cheekbones…I had my makeup professionally done by Catherine Hickland, a soap star from One Life To Live. (In case you want to see who she is, her bio is here.) She has her own cosmetics company and before she became an actress, she started out as a makeup artist. Soap opera fans will know her also as the wife of Michael E. Knight (All My Children's Tad Martin). The show airs March 28.

Highlights? Catherine and celebrity makeup artist Bruce telling me I had great skin and cheekbones…making my grand entrance after the makeover…seeing how gorgeous Jules Asner is first-hand…meeting comedian Lynn Koplitz and making her laugh…having people around whose only job is to make me look beautiful…getting some free makeup...stretch limos to and from the studio...feeling glamorous and having people do a doubletake when they see me on the street…feeling a little superior to everyone else for a little while…

I understand, now. People on TV are treated better than other people, and sometimes they begin to think they actually are, intrinsically, better. It was suddenly clear: feeling special doesn’t mean that you’re better, just happier with being different.

4 Comments:

At 2:07 AM, December 17, 2004, Blogger Plantation said...

Geez Louise, so you're gonna be on friggin' TV? Hmm, don't know if I can hang out with you anymore, Miss Big Shot.

 
At 10:45 AM, December 17, 2004, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Very cool, I'll be sure to keep an eye out for it.

Barry

 
At 12:38 PM, December 17, 2004, Blogger Andrea said...

The closest I've gotten to that was accompanying two Fringe Festival actors to a daytime talk show at the community access TV station because I "freelance" as a communications person/publicist.
[Quotation marks are utilized because it's always been unpaid resume padding working with friends who know that I want my career to take that direction.]
Their makeup artist was a volunteer. The coffee was good (Starbucks) but we didn't get fed even though the segment after ours was a cooking segment.

First community access, then network.

 
At 1:16 PM, December 17, 2004, Blogger Coelecanth said...

I don't know why people insist on treating tv folk different than they'd treat anyone else. I say be nice to the nice ones and dis the jerks. I once got to use the phrase "Your celebrity is not recognized here". Unfortunatly it wasn't on anyone truly famous.

Here's the sad part of all this: The bookstore I work in is very media-genic. We get local tv scouting here all the time and the occasional movie production has checked us out. We haven't had a single film crew in here since I started treating their scouts with indiffence. Yup, even at the lowly level of location scout for local tv these folks come to expect the fawning.

Anyway, congrats on your appearance, sounds like it was great fun.

Won't be watching it unless you drop us a reminder closer to the date. I can't plan what I'm going to have for lunch let alone 3 months from now.

 

Post a Comment

<< Home

My Urban Kvetch: WEDNESDAY RIDDLE EXPLAINED

Friday, December 17, 2004

WEDNESDAY RIDDLE EXPLAINED

On Wednesday morning, I was in my stretch limo on the way to the studio, schmoozing with the driver about all the other celebrities he’s driven in his career. There’s the expected range of good, bad and ugly. Cher’s a diva. Gere’s a jerk. Reeve was a saint, even before the accident. We talk about celebrity, and how the power of prominence can either be used for good or for evil. Of course, those are my words, not his. He uses words that I don’t hear every day, like “Fuggedaboutit” and “not for nothin’.”

I arrived at the studio and a PA escorted me to a room with my name on the door; the room is only slightly smaller than my apartment. There’s food there—2 muffins, some fruit, and two bowls of butter and cream cheese that indicated that the room was not invented for me. Someone must have eaten the bagels before I got there. Had I been a true diva, I would have thrown a rock star style fit, but I decided to let it slide (this once).

For those who asked, and those who didn’t, I spent Wednesday afternoon taping an episode of the WB talk show Life & Style. No, it wasn’t my big break, no audition to take over for Jules Asner in the glamour spot, nor had I been invited to share my expertise on the Jewish dating scene. I was there merely for my cheekbones…I had my makeup professionally done by Catherine Hickland, a soap star from One Life To Live. (In case you want to see who she is, her bio is here.) She has her own cosmetics company and before she became an actress, she started out as a makeup artist. Soap opera fans will know her also as the wife of Michael E. Knight (All My Children's Tad Martin). The show airs March 28.

Highlights? Catherine and celebrity makeup artist Bruce telling me I had great skin and cheekbones…making my grand entrance after the makeover…seeing how gorgeous Jules Asner is first-hand…meeting comedian Lynn Koplitz and making her laugh…having people around whose only job is to make me look beautiful…getting some free makeup...stretch limos to and from the studio...feeling glamorous and having people do a doubletake when they see me on the street…feeling a little superior to everyone else for a little while…

I understand, now. People on TV are treated better than other people, and sometimes they begin to think they actually are, intrinsically, better. It was suddenly clear: feeling special doesn’t mean that you’re better, just happier with being different.

4 Comments:

At 2:07 AM, December 17, 2004, Blogger Plantation said...

Geez Louise, so you're gonna be on friggin' TV? Hmm, don't know if I can hang out with you anymore, Miss Big Shot.

 
At 10:45 AM, December 17, 2004, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Very cool, I'll be sure to keep an eye out for it.

Barry

 
At 12:38 PM, December 17, 2004, Blogger Andrea said...

The closest I've gotten to that was accompanying two Fringe Festival actors to a daytime talk show at the community access TV station because I "freelance" as a communications person/publicist.
[Quotation marks are utilized because it's always been unpaid resume padding working with friends who know that I want my career to take that direction.]
Their makeup artist was a volunteer. The coffee was good (Starbucks) but we didn't get fed even though the segment after ours was a cooking segment.

First community access, then network.

 
At 1:16 PM, December 17, 2004, Blogger Coelecanth said...

I don't know why people insist on treating tv folk different than they'd treat anyone else. I say be nice to the nice ones and dis the jerks. I once got to use the phrase "Your celebrity is not recognized here". Unfortunatly it wasn't on anyone truly famous.

Here's the sad part of all this: The bookstore I work in is very media-genic. We get local tv scouting here all the time and the occasional movie production has checked us out. We haven't had a single film crew in here since I started treating their scouts with indiffence. Yup, even at the lowly level of location scout for local tv these folks come to expect the fawning.

Anyway, congrats on your appearance, sounds like it was great fun.

Won't be watching it unless you drop us a reminder closer to the date. I can't plan what I'm going to have for lunch let alone 3 months from now.

 

Post a Comment

<< Home