Sunday, June 27, 2004

MOORE TO THINK ABOUT

Walking into the theater, I thought I was prepared. I had just seen Mark Hamill walking his dogs. They were small, fluffy and white, as if clouds had transmogrified into canines. Democrats had a table set up outside, and kept asking us "Do you want to help defeat President Bush?" as they hit us up for funds.

But walking out after seeing Fahrenheit 9/11, a masterful if incredibly disturbing film, I realized that there is no such thing as prepared. Just as I was not prepared for Gore to win the presidency and yet not be inaugurated. Just as no one was prepared for 9/11. Just as hearing statistics of war losses is never the same as seeing the pain on a mother's face when she learns her son or daughter's been killed in a land far from home.

After the movie, which was replete with incredibly appropriate musical selections and film documentation of our President's bizarre facial tics and dulcet intonations, I felt my heart racing. I stood on line for the ladies' room, and felt an exacerbated sense of frustration, not at the line, which was considerable, but at the film and its ramifications. My blood pressure and my dander were up. We were riled, all of us. And we felt helpless.

The film reminded us all that democracy is necessarily limited; our government cannot reveal to us all the information it has. By the same token, Michael Moore clearly made a film that represents his opinion, his version of the truth. So, whose truth is truthiest? There's no way to know.

It's a bit shy of conspiracy theory, which I partially embrace due to my foundational entertainment diet of Oliver Stone films and nine seasons of the X-Files, but I am at the point where I'm not sure how much of an impact individuals can make on the electoral process. Yes, I'll vote, but I'm not in love with Kerry either. I don't know what the answer is.

I'm trying to re-calibrate my mind, to bring myself back to the time before the movie, when my ignorance was my bliss, when I could watch Luke Skywalker become Luke Dogwalker. And I'm having trouble.

10 Comments:

At 7:02 PM, June 27, 2004, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Oh, my God, you saw Mark Hamill???? You are so lucky. I'm a huge, HUGE Star Wars fan. Oh my God.
Chayyei Sarah

 
At 8:25 PM, June 27, 2004, Blogger Dawn said...

F 9/11 is a very important movie, in my opinion, whether you agree or disagree with Michael Moore and his views. I thought it was absolutely evident that so much of the film was intentionally aimed at pushing my buttons.

But aside from the magic of film-making, there seemed to be just SO MUCH information that was right up there, in living color, on unedited clips, that you would be hard pressed to ignore. Enough information to at least start to ask questions. I mean, honestly, why would people try to ban a film that they consider a "work of fiction?" Because there was too much fact in this "fictional work" to ignore. I hope many, many people see this movie, and really think long and hard about its message.

 
At 2:36 AM, June 28, 2004, Blogger Jen(nifer) said...

So, whose truth is truthiest?

Excellent phraseology!

 
At 5:45 AM, June 28, 2004, Blogger singlegalnyc said...

I liked the phraseology, too!

Great review! Maybe you could publish it somewhere??

I've got a bunch of posts in my blogging queue (more commonly known as drafts), so stay posted :) i'm loving this blogging thing and definitely have lots to opine about (to steal the adjective that describes your blog)

Happy Monday!

 
At 10:38 AM, June 28, 2004, Blogger Michael said...

Esther, I suspect that most of us felt angry, disgusted, and a little helpless after leaving the movie. The thing that boggles my mind is, Congress impeached Clinton for a trivial sexual stupidity and the lies afterward but not a voice on Capitol Hill has been raised in real anguish over this whole Iraq mess and the Bush-Saudi oil connection, which has far greater implications for our country.

 
At 1:15 PM, June 28, 2004, Blogger Dawn Summers said...

Michael,

If that movie taught us anything (and I'm not saying it did) it's that we shouldn't be looking to Congress for any assistance -- they are "missing."

 
At 1:26 PM, June 28, 2004, Blogger Karol said...

Hey Dawn,

Who tried to 'ban' Fahrenheit 911? Do you know about the campaign finance laws that govern political speech? Or, should those only apply to conservatives?

 
At 2:00 PM, June 28, 2004, Blogger Michael said...

Dawn,

Congress is missing? Yeah, it is. I shouldn't be surprised at the spinelessness of its members -- I've known so many over the years, and they never seem to change.

 
At 6:07 PM, June 28, 2004, Blogger David said...

"So, whose truth is truthiest? There's no way to know."

How lazy can you get?

 
At 10:22 PM, June 28, 2004, Blogger PN said...

It's not lazy. A person is allowed to have mixed feelings. After all, none of us really know what the truth is. It's all speculation.

 

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My Urban Kvetch: MOORE TO THINK ABOUT

Sunday, June 27, 2004

MOORE TO THINK ABOUT

Walking into the theater, I thought I was prepared. I had just seen Mark Hamill walking his dogs. They were small, fluffy and white, as if clouds had transmogrified into canines. Democrats had a table set up outside, and kept asking us "Do you want to help defeat President Bush?" as they hit us up for funds.

But walking out after seeing Fahrenheit 9/11, a masterful if incredibly disturbing film, I realized that there is no such thing as prepared. Just as I was not prepared for Gore to win the presidency and yet not be inaugurated. Just as no one was prepared for 9/11. Just as hearing statistics of war losses is never the same as seeing the pain on a mother's face when she learns her son or daughter's been killed in a land far from home.

After the movie, which was replete with incredibly appropriate musical selections and film documentation of our President's bizarre facial tics and dulcet intonations, I felt my heart racing. I stood on line for the ladies' room, and felt an exacerbated sense of frustration, not at the line, which was considerable, but at the film and its ramifications. My blood pressure and my dander were up. We were riled, all of us. And we felt helpless.

The film reminded us all that democracy is necessarily limited; our government cannot reveal to us all the information it has. By the same token, Michael Moore clearly made a film that represents his opinion, his version of the truth. So, whose truth is truthiest? There's no way to know.

It's a bit shy of conspiracy theory, which I partially embrace due to my foundational entertainment diet of Oliver Stone films and nine seasons of the X-Files, but I am at the point where I'm not sure how much of an impact individuals can make on the electoral process. Yes, I'll vote, but I'm not in love with Kerry either. I don't know what the answer is.

I'm trying to re-calibrate my mind, to bring myself back to the time before the movie, when my ignorance was my bliss, when I could watch Luke Skywalker become Luke Dogwalker. And I'm having trouble.

10 Comments:

At 7:02 PM, June 27, 2004, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Oh, my God, you saw Mark Hamill???? You are so lucky. I'm a huge, HUGE Star Wars fan. Oh my God.
Chayyei Sarah

 
At 8:25 PM, June 27, 2004, Blogger Dawn said...

F 9/11 is a very important movie, in my opinion, whether you agree or disagree with Michael Moore and his views. I thought it was absolutely evident that so much of the film was intentionally aimed at pushing my buttons.

But aside from the magic of film-making, there seemed to be just SO MUCH information that was right up there, in living color, on unedited clips, that you would be hard pressed to ignore. Enough information to at least start to ask questions. I mean, honestly, why would people try to ban a film that they consider a "work of fiction?" Because there was too much fact in this "fictional work" to ignore. I hope many, many people see this movie, and really think long and hard about its message.

 
At 2:36 AM, June 28, 2004, Blogger Jen(nifer) said...

So, whose truth is truthiest?

Excellent phraseology!

 
At 5:45 AM, June 28, 2004, Blogger singlegalnyc said...

I liked the phraseology, too!

Great review! Maybe you could publish it somewhere??

I've got a bunch of posts in my blogging queue (more commonly known as drafts), so stay posted :) i'm loving this blogging thing and definitely have lots to opine about (to steal the adjective that describes your blog)

Happy Monday!

 
At 10:38 AM, June 28, 2004, Blogger Michael said...

Esther, I suspect that most of us felt angry, disgusted, and a little helpless after leaving the movie. The thing that boggles my mind is, Congress impeached Clinton for a trivial sexual stupidity and the lies afterward but not a voice on Capitol Hill has been raised in real anguish over this whole Iraq mess and the Bush-Saudi oil connection, which has far greater implications for our country.

 
At 1:15 PM, June 28, 2004, Blogger Dawn Summers said...

Michael,

If that movie taught us anything (and I'm not saying it did) it's that we shouldn't be looking to Congress for any assistance -- they are "missing."

 
At 1:26 PM, June 28, 2004, Blogger Karol said...

Hey Dawn,

Who tried to 'ban' Fahrenheit 911? Do you know about the campaign finance laws that govern political speech? Or, should those only apply to conservatives?

 
At 2:00 PM, June 28, 2004, Blogger Michael said...

Dawn,

Congress is missing? Yeah, it is. I shouldn't be surprised at the spinelessness of its members -- I've known so many over the years, and they never seem to change.

 
At 6:07 PM, June 28, 2004, Blogger David said...

"So, whose truth is truthiest? There's no way to know."

How lazy can you get?

 
At 10:22 PM, June 28, 2004, Blogger PN said...

It's not lazy. A person is allowed to have mixed feelings. After all, none of us really know what the truth is. It's all speculation.

 

Post a Comment

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